About

Partnering with Mana Whenua

Eke Panuku recognises iwi and hapū have a strong historical association with Tāmaki Makaurau. Mana whenua have occupied this whenua [land] over many generations, and they seek to maintain their relationship with the land and sea.

Why do we partner with mana whenua?

Why do we partner with mana whenua?

Within Tāmaki Makaurau, the council recognises 19 mana whenua. The council and Eke Panuku have a role to assist the Crown in discharging their obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Eke Panuku aspires to develop a partnership with mana whenua to create an Aotearoa that reflects our shared aspirations. We know, when we work with mana whenua, we achieve better outcomes than we would alone.

What are the aspirations of mana whenua?

What are the aspirations of mana whenua?

Mana whenua are not a single group, instead each iwi has their own identity, with their own moemoeā [dreams] and aspirations. However, these moemoeā can be placed under five pou to help focus on what is important to mana whenua – most likely the same aspirations as everyone else:

  1. Governance

    We involve mana whenua in decision-making
  2. Culture

    We will create spaces that express and showcase Māori identity
  3. Economic

    We will grow intergenerational Māori wealth by creating economic opportunities for mana whenua
  4. Wellbeing

    We will foster a sense of community and connectedness and enhance the wellbeing of Māori here in Tāmaki Makaurau
  5. Natural environment

    We will leave the environment in a better state than we’ve found it and improve te mauri o te taiao.
How do we engage with mana whenua?

How do we engage with mana whenua?

Each week, Eke Panuku facilitates a meeting with our mana whenua partners to get their input into our projects. Mana whenua assist us to ensure that our projects are culture-led, place-based, and community-driven. Māori culture is our point of difference in the world, and the work we do with mana whenua helps us create a landscape that is uniquely Aotearoa. On our projects, we also look to create opportunities for mana whenua to express their tikanga, exercise their role as kaitiaki, and continue to perform their ancient cultural practices. As well as weekly engagement on projects, mana whenua meet with our Executive Lead Team quarterly and the Eke Panuku Board twice a year to maintain relationships and discuss any overarching issues and opportunities.

Engagement with mana whenua on public realm projects

Engagement with mana whenua on public realm projects

A significant amount of work that we do with mana whenua is focused on building public spaces within our urban regeneration programmes. We engage with mana whenua in the initial stages of a project to identify where and how they would like to be involved. When designing and building public spaces, we attempt to involve mana whenua worldviews. This can look like, for example, reflecting mana whenua cultural narratives in the design of spaces. Often, we work with mana whenua-nominated artists and technical experts to create spaces that reflect Māori identity.

Engagement with mana whenua on commercial development opportunities

Engagement with mana whenua on commercial development opportunities

Eke Panuku engages with mana whenua when preparing commercial development opportunities within our regeneration programme. Eke Panuku either engages directly with mana whenua as developers, or we broker conversations between developers and mana whenua. We believe we have a role to showcase the benefit of working with mana whenua to our stakeholders in the private sector. We can see the benefit of involving mana whenua in designing our development sites. Our property development team can also assist mana whenua to identify commercial opportunities within our portfolio.